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3 Bad Home Design Decisions to Avoid When Building

3 bad home design decisions to avoid when buildingDecisions, decisions. The best and worst part of building a custom home is that every aspect of the home’s design and materials is left up to decisions. It’s what we love about being a custom home builder and a key ingredient to building the best home for the best value, but a lack in guidance can leave room for bad design decisions.

We work with a highly skilled team of designers, architects, and contractors to help guide homeowners through the process so our clients end up with beautiful custom home that they will be happy with for years to come. But we know there is some bad design lurking out there, and here some of the bad home design decisions to avoid when building your custom home.

Not Another Wall

Recently a Realtor told us about a great house that they’ve had on the market for quite a few months. Even with a big price drop, good location, and more than 40 showings, the homeowner hasn’t had one offer. Fortunately, when you’re showing the other agents give feedback, and the big sticking point was the layout and too many walls. Without enough windows or high enough ceilings it can feel too boxed in, and even a seasoned do-it-yourselfer is hesitant to take out a wall to open up the floor plan. Planning for an open floor plan not only makes your new home more appealing, but allows natural light to flow through the house and saves money on lighting costs.

Changing the Face of the Neighborhood

custom-clayton-home-addition-exterior

You can see that careful attention was paid to matching the bricks to the existing home for this three story addition we completed in Clayton, MO.

Infill building is a popular option to get a green home in a great neighborhood, but building a super modern house nested along 100-year-old homes will probably not win you any new neighbor of the year awards, and some cities even have standards in place to prevent new homes from changing the face of their community. Finding an architect and builder to design a home that is exactly what you want, in the right neighborhood for what you want takes some research, but it will prevent your home from being the square peg.

That’s One Obvious Addition

If you’re planning a home renovation or addition it’s important to pay attention to detail, but just slapping a whole new room on without taking into account architectural and design elements of your existing structure makes your home feel disjointed, and can cheapen even the most expensive renovation work. Stitch in and refinish hardwood floors to flow throughout the home, work with your builder to find bricks that will match your existing home, and find interior design details from other parts of the home, such as a window styles or archway designs, to repeat in your new addition. Making your addition feel like like it belongs with the rest of the home will make your remodeling project one you can live in and live with.

We’d love to discuss your new home construction, addition or renovation project with you. Give us a call at 314-392-9631 for your no obligation consult with a home building professional, or request more information about Hibbs Homes by contacting us here.

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